And with that the monk mounted an old donkey and rode it
 slowly out the monastery gate, as the boy walked by his side. He was ;anxious for the monk's great lecture to begin, but the old man said
 nothing at all. Not wanting to seem disrespectful, the boy remained
 silent as well, walking and waiting..">






The true story of a monk, boy, donkey and murmuring souls.

From:  "jagbir singh" <www.adishakti.org@gmail.com>
Date:  Wed Feb 9, 2005  6:31 pm
Subject:  The true story of a monk, boy, donkey and murmuring souls.
 
—- In shriadishakti@yahoogroups.com, "jagbir singh"
<adishakti_org@y...> wrote:
>
> Meeting Shri Mataji in the Sahasrara is absolutely unnecessary/not
> required for any measure of spiritual progress. Although Shri
> Mataji has claimed She exists in the Sahasrara never has She made
> it a requirement. This has no bearing whatsoever on self-
> realization.
>
> But such evidence is absolutely required if we SYs are to prove
> that Shri Mataji is indeed the Adi Shakti. The title of Shri
> Lalita, Divine Mother and Adi Shakti has already been stolen from
> under the noses of subtle system SYs because they have no guts to
> make any public attempt to claim that honor for Shri Mataji. Now
> we have to deal with foolish SYs ridiculing the experiences and
> obstructing those trying to salvage some honor. Some of them are
> so dull that it is almost impossible to make them realize the
> damage they are doing.
>
> And i keep telling that such experiences are mandatory to advance
> the Divine Message. Without such evidence there is just no way any
> SY can have the confidence to speak about it. All they can do is
> claim Sahaja Yoga is about the subtle system.
>
> So what can be done to make these dull SYs brighter? .......
> repeat after repeat after repeat after repeat of the same stuff
> until they can finally begin to grasp. With such murmuring SYs
> within the organization spreading their negativity why blame
> outsiders for our failures? i have always maintained that the
> negativity is within. Those looking outside are just trying to
> find scapegoats.
>
> jagbir
>


Once upon a time a young boy visited a monastery, seeking to
learn the great truths of life. He approached a wise old monk and
asked him, "Father, will you teach me a great lesson?" The old man
smiled and replied: "Of course I will, child. Come with me and I will
teach you something about duty."

And with that the monk mounted an old donkey and rode it
slowly out the monastery gate, as the boy walked by his side. He was
anxious for the monk's great lecture to begin, but the old man said
nothing at all. Not wanting to seem disrespectful, the boy remained
silent as well, walking and waiting.

Soon they entered a small village. A few murmuring souls turned to
look at them, pointing and saying, "Look at that selfish old man —
riding a donkey, while this poor little boy is forced to walk!"

The two ignored these remarks; but as soon as they were out
of sight the monk let the boy take his place.

In the next village they entered, still more murmuring souls frowned
upon them and said, "Look at that thoughtless, awful boy! How can
he let that poor old monk walk while he lazily rides along on the
donkey? And how can the monk be so weak and unwise as to endure
it?"

Once again, the pair made no reply—but a little further along
the road, the monk jumped onto the donkey behind the boy.

Upon reaching a third village, more murmuring souls stared aghast at
them, saying: "How stupid and cruel can two people be, making that
poor little donkey carry both of them?! The unfortunate beast will
drop of exhaustion before they reach their destination!"

But again the monk was silent and the boy followed suit. As
they left town, the monk tried yet another combination, with both of
them walking at the donkey's side while the animal trotted happily
along unburdened.

As they entered a fourth village, more laughter and criticism
was thrown at them: "Have you ever seen two fools such as these?
Why, here they have a perfectly good donkey, and they both choose
to walk!"

Still the monk showed no concern. Then, soon after they left
the fourth village, the boy noticed the walls of the monastery
looming ahead of them—the journey has been nothing more than a
long circle! Disappointed, he finally broke the silence, and asked:
"But Father, what about your great lesson?"

To which the monk smiled and replied: "It is over, my child, and
it is simply this: Always do your duty, and do it without fear of
what other murmuring souls will think—for there will always be
those who condemn you, regardless of what you say or do."
 


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