“I Also Rode On The Tiger.”

Arwinder then clarified that Shri Mataji occasionally explains the meaning of the Sanskrit words She uses while talking to him in English. Apparently, there are many words in Sanskrit with no direct English translation, and their interpretation is necessary for conversations to be more clearly understood.

Lalita
Durga Devi is the Symbol of Cosmic Harmony.
The warrior goddess, riding upon a lion and wielding
a weapon in each of her 10 arms. She is depicted
calm-faced and smiling as She defeats the buffalo
demon. The latter symbolizes that egoistic force of
maya (the everyday world) which deludes individuals
and keeps them from knowing their innate nature as
god. Durga, the fierce and creative shakti aspect of
Godhead, incarnates to restore order in the world and
peace in the heart of suffering devotees in any time
of crisis.
On July 13, 1998 at 11.25 a.m. Arwinder again told his father that he had sat on Shri Mataji's tiger.

Arwinder: “I also rode on the tiger. I wanted to know how it was, friendly.”

Question: “Did you ask Shri Mataji's permission?”

Arwinder: “Yeah, I have to.”

Question: “How big was the tiger?”

Arwinder: “Maybe long as one meter, maybe longer.”

Question: “How many times have you sat on this tiger?”

Arwinder: “Once.”

Question: “Only once?”

Arwinder: “Yeah.”

Question: “Why did you want to sit on the tiger?”

Arwinder: “I want to see if it is friendly and all those things. I just wanted to try out.”

Question: “Were you not afraid?”

Arwinder: “No, because I know Shri Mataji's tiger is nice. I have already been with Her, so it must be nice.”

Question: “Was Shri Mataji alone, or were there other people also?”

Arwinder: “Other people, Shri Shiva and all that.”

Question: “Did they also sit on the tiger?”

Arwinder: “Yeah.”

Question: “You are sure?”

Arwinder: “Yeah.”

Question: “They sat after you, or before you?”

Arwinder: “Yeah, before.”

Question: “Did Shri Mataji talk to the tiger?”

Arwinder: “Yeah, in different language.”

Question: “What do you mean by 'different language'?”

Arwinder: “Like the language that was invented by Shri Mataji" (i.e., Sanskrit.)

Question: “Do you understand that language?”

Arwinder: “Not that much.”

Question: “What you mean by 'not that much'? Can you give me words of that language?”

Arwinder: “No, I forget.”

Question: “You mean you only talk that language down there?”

Arwinder: “Yeah.”

Question: “Then you say that they talk to you in English?”

Arwinder then clarified that Shri Mataji occasionally explains the meaning of the Sanskrit words She uses while talking to him in English. Apparently, there are many words in Sanskrit with no direct English translation, and their interpretation is necessary for conversations to be more clearly understood.]

Question: “How old are you when with Shri Mataji — eight-years old, or bigger?”

Arwinder: “Bigger.”

Question: “You mean you are more than eight-years old?”

Arwinder: “Yeah, or smaller.”

Question: “I don't understand all this. What you mean bigger, or smaller?”

Arwinder: “I can be bigger (older) if I want, or smaller.”

Question: “Were you as old as papa?”

Arwinder: “No.”

Question: “Are the people as Shri Shiva as old as papa?”

Arwinder: “More older.”

Question: “How do you know?”

Arwinder: “From their size.”

Question: “Do they have white hair?”

Arwinder: “White hair? What white hair?”

Question: “Like papa?”

(His father held some tufts of salt and pepper hair from his own head.)

Arwinder: “No.”

Question: “Does Shri Mataji have white hair?”

Arwinder: “No.”

Question: “Is She young or old?”

Arwinder: “Old! But She doesn't have white hair.”

Question: “How do you know She is old?”

Arwinder: “I asked Her.”



Dear All,

At 8.25 a.m. today November 9th. 2007, prior to approving this post, i again asked my son Arwinder about his experience of sitting on Shri Mataji's tiger years ago.

Question: “Can you still remember riding on Shri Mataji's tiger?”

Arwinder: “Yeah.”

Question: “You mean you can still recollect your experiences with Shri Mataji after all these years?”

Arwinder: “Yeah, kind of, if you remind me.”

Question: “I never asked you this before, Arwinder, but did you see Shri Mataji sitting on the tiger?”

Arwinder: “Yes.” (affirmatively)

Question: “How many times?”

Arwinder: “A few times but i cannot tell you exactly how many.”



Shakti: Realm of the Divine Mother
Aum Durgayai Namaha!

DURGA

Durga Ya Devi sarvabhuteshu, jati rupena samsthita,
Namasthasyai, namasthasyai, namasthasyai namo namaha!


O Goddess who resides in all creatures in the form of birth,
Hail to thee, hail to thee, all hail to thee!

Durga is one of the most impressive and formidable goddesses in Hindu mythology. She is a warrior queen with eighteen arms, each wielding a particular weapon. Her primary function is to combat the demons that threaten the stability of the cosmos. Despite this, she maintains a benign look on her face. This reflects the fact that she attacks not in order to kill but only when we invite her to come and deliver us from the devilish ego that threatens our spiritual life.

There are many accounts of Durga's origin, but the most well known is told in the Devi Mahatmyam ("text of the wondrous essence of the goddess"), which describes her as an unconquerable, sublime warrior maid who was birthed from the combined powers of all the gods gathered in council. She was created to combat the buffalo demon Mahisha, who could be killed only by a female power (see chapter 12).

Another story of Durga's origin is found in the Devi Bhagavatam: Once there was a great asura known as Durgama. He realized that the Vedas were the main source of the strength of the devas (gods) and decided that the best way to weaken the gods would be to steal the Vedas. With this in mind, he started to do rigorous tapas to the creator Brahma. When Brahma appeared, Durgama asked for the gift of the Vedas, which Brahma promptly gave over to him.

With the disappearance of the Vedas from the world, the Brahmins forgot their chanting and mantras. No longer did the gods receive the fire sacrifices by which they had been nourished, and they became weaker and weaker. Unrighteousness reared its ugly head in the world. There was a severe drought; the earth refused to yield any grain and famine swept the land. Countless numbers of people, cattle, and plants died for want of food.

The Brahmins went to the Himalayas and did great penance to invoke Adi Shakti, the supreme power. They begged her to restore the Vedic mantras to them so that they could again perform their daily rituals.

At the end of their penance, Maheswari, the great mother of the universe, appeared before them in all her glory. Her color was dark blue, the color of eternal space. She had a hundred eyes, large and lustrous like blue lotuses, and her breasts were round and elevated. She had four hands. On the right, one hand held arrows and the other a lotus. On the left, one hand held a great bow and the other vegetables, fruits, flowers, and roots. She was the essence of beauty, luminous like a thousand suns, the ocean of mercy. When she heard the sad tale of the Brahmins and saw the pitiful condition of the earth she began to shed waters from her lovely eyes. For nine days and nights tears poured down from her eyes until all the rivers and ponds and lakes began to fill up. This incarnation of the goddess was known as Satakshi (the hundred-eyed). The gods who had been hiding in caves and mountains now started to come out and began to sing her praises. The goddess now showered the earth with plenty. Grains, vegetables, fruits, and roots were made available for all. Grass started to sprout so that the cattle could feed. From that day she came to be known as Shakambari (the giver of edible vegetation).

When the demon Durgama heard of this he was furious and set out to fight with the goddess. Seeing this, Shakambari produced from her own body countless shaktis who started annihilating the army of the asura. But Durgama vanquished the shaktis and eventually came before the goddess. She shot fifteen arrows at him. The first fourteen arrows killed his horses and charioteer, pierced his two eyes, and cut off his arms and flag, and finally the fifteenth arrow pierced his heart and killed him.

The world became a peaceful place once more, and the devas extolled the goddess. She blessed them and said, “The Vedas are parts of my own body, so cherish them well. If you lose them, great calamities will fall on you, as you have seen. Henceforth I will be known as Durga, since I have killed the demon Durgama.”

Sometime around the fourth century, images of Durga slaying a buffalo began to be common throughout the subcontinent. By the sixth century Durga had become a household word and was worshipped everywhere. Lalitha is always depicted as a shanta murti or one with all peaceful qualities, despite the fact that she killed the demon Bhanda, but Durga is ever the warrior goddess, often seen astride her fierce vehicle, the lion.

Durga's enormous appeal seems rather strange when you consider the fact that she violates the norm of the model Hindu woman. She is not submissive, nor is she subordinate to any male deity. She does not fulfill household duties and excels mainly in battle. She doesn't lend her power to any male deities but takes from them in order to perform her own heroic exploits. On the other hand, the male deities are said to willingly surrender their potencies to her! She is not the shakti (power) of any male god but is pure shakti unattached to anything else. She herself is shown to contain various shaktis that she can call forth any time she wills. She is not the consort of any male. Some of the demons become enamored of her beauty, but she will have nothing to do with them and refuses to marry any of them.

Durga exists outside normal social structures and provides an invigorating view of feminine power, which lies repressed in most societies. The law books of Manu (the great lawgiver whose books are taken as the basis for the different types of behavior of various classes of people in all walks of society) declare that a woman should always be protected by a man: in childhood by her father, in youth by her husband, and in old age by her sons. In other words, a woman was considered to be incapable of looking after herself and was always to be kept under the protection of some male. It is to the credit of the ancient rishis that in Durga they portrayed a goddess who totally violates all the traditional views of women.

Thus Durga portrays the divinity who stands outside the so-called civilized order of established dharma and can be found only by one who has the courage to step out of the orderly world as we know it. The gods themselves refer to her by many dubious names. She is known as Mahamoha, the great deluder; as Mahasuri, the great demoness; as Kalaratri, the black night; as Maharatri, the great darkness; as Moharatri, the night of delusion; and as Tamasi, the delusion. As these names imply, she is full of numbing, deluding, and dark qualities. Continuously she is referred to as Maha Maya, the power that throws people into the bondage of delusion and attachment.

The juxtaposition of auspicious and terrible qualities in Durga is meant to show that she is really a portrait of the macrocosm. The universe is conceived as a living organism in the form of the goddess. In her auspicious forms she depicts the world as unceasingly fruitful, beautiful, and filled with the energy of the divine, which supports and nourishes. As The Mother she dotes on her children and spoils them with all her bounties. As food she gives herself to be eaten by her children, and as sexual desire she prompts all creatures to take part in the universal dance of creation and procreation. She gives generously. She is life itself.

The Puranas describe nine different aspects for Durga, known collectively as the Navadurga. First and foremost, she is the goddess of inspiration, who gives us the impetus to start on the spiritual path. Second, she is the goddess who tells us to undertake studies from spiritual books, which will encourage us to continue on the path. Third, she is the goddess of spiritual practice, who motivates us to take up some sort of sadhana (spiritual discipline). Fourth, she is the goddess of inner refinement by which our mind is progressively cultured. Fifth, she is the goddess who takes us closer to the divine within us. Sixth is she who makes us completely pure. Seventh is the goddess who enables us to give up this delusion of duality. Eighth is the goddess who urges us to unite with the inner light, and ninth is the goddess who grants us liberation. The Navadurga are worshipped by all Hindus, though only the yogis know their esoteric significance. They represent the nine psychic forces that will lead us to our spiritual goal. At every moment on the spiritual path, one or the other is guiding us.

Durga's association with food is one of her distinctive characteristics. She is that mysterious power that transforms apparently lifeless seeds into life-giving food when they are sowed. All types of fertility are apparent in her. She possesses the power to invigorate all beings and give them a new lease on life. All plants and creatures on this planet are identified with her, for she is the manifestation of the fertile power that resides in the earth and brings into life all creatures. She manifests as infinite organisms that in turn feed more complex organisms. She is also the sexual impulse that characterizes all created beings. She is manifest wherever sexual desire appears. Kama, the god of love, is her agent.

The biggest festival connected with this goddess is Durga Puja, sometimes known as Navaratri. It is celebrated during the first nine days of the bright half of the lunar month of Aswin, in what we know as October, which coincides with the autumn harvest in northern India. On the very first day a clay pot containing Ganga (Ganges) water, sheaves from the harvest, and some banana leaves is decorated and placed on the altar. This pot is identified with the pot of the nectar of immortality that the gods churned from the Sea of Nectar. This story of the churning of the Sea of Nectar is mentioned in almost all the Puranas. It took place at a time when the gods had lost their youth and vitality and Vishnu advised them to churn this sea to get the nectar, which would return their youthful vigor.

To one side of the altar some earth is kept in which are sowed the navadhanyas or the nine types of grain. As each type of grain is sowed, the priest chants, “Aum, you are rice [or wheat or barley, etc., for each of the nine grains], you are life, you are the life of the gods, you are our life, you are our internal life, you are long life, you give life. The sun with his rays gives you the milk of life and Varuna nourishes you with water.” This ritual denotes Durga's power to induce plant fertility. By the tenth day these grains sprout and are distributed as prasada (leftovers from offerings to the gods). In some parts of India, especially Bengal, animal sacrifices are offered during this festival. The buffalo especially is killed to indicate Durga's killing of the buffalo demon Mahisha.

But Durga is paradoxical. If she is life, she is also death, which is necessary to sustain life. If she gives life, she must also be nourished by life in the form of death. A gain in any part has to be compensated by a loss somewhere else. Just as there is no life without death, so also there is no gain without loss. Hence Durga is also shown to have many terrible manifestations. She reveals the inescapable truth of this world: that if life and nourishment are to continue, continuous slaughter and death must also continue. Food that sustains life can be procured only through death and carnage. Life and death constitute a continuous process of giving and getting, a process in which the energy of the goddess is continuously recycled.

Both beautiful and grotesque, maternal and martial, Durga can take terrifying forms that demand blood for nourishment and finally the very lives of all creatures. Her thirst for blood is established in various texts. The Mahanirvana Tantra, for example, describes her as drenched in blood, grinding up the world at the time of dissolution.

In the Devi Bhagavatam the gods ask Durga to show them her vishwarupa or universal form, just as Arjuna asked Krishna to show his universal form in the Bhagavad Gita. She agrees, and the gods are stunned to see her. She has thousands of heads, eyes, and feet; her entire body blazes with fierce, destructive flames and her teeth make horrible, grinding noises. Her eyes burn with flames brighter than a million suns, and the gods tremble as they see her consume the universe. They plead with her to resume her gentle aspect.

In the Devi Mahatmyam, she is said to quaff wine at intervals and roar and behave in a most atrocious manner. At the end of the episode she asks her devotees to worship her with their own flesh and blood.

All the negative qualities found in the world are found in Durga. Her greatness lies in the fact that she alone is qualified to destroy these qualities in us, because she possesses all these qualities within herself. She exemplifies the homeopathic principle of like destroying like, and for these reasons her worship has a great hold on society, even today. During the process of yoga, the human consciousness is lifted up from chakra to chakra, starting from the muladhara chakra at the base of the spine to the sahasrara chakra at the top of the skull. During this time it encounters inner demons ranging from immature emotions like jealousy, fear, greed, and lust up to more serious forms of derangement including paranoia and megalomania. Each weapon in Durga's hands is meant to eradicate these negative emotions. The devotee can meditate on any of Durga's weapons in order to clear these negative emotions. Her weapons in fact serve two purposes: they can combat negativity as well as instill positive traits of thought, like self-discipline, introspection, selfless service, prayer, devotion, clarity of vision, and a cheerful outlook.

Durga's fierce aspects are meant to portray those dark qualities in the human being that thirst for violence and warfare. She is the personified wrath of the whole of humanity. When she apparently loses control over herself, she personifies the mob mentality, the thirst for violence, that ever lurks in the human heart: the prod that drives the rabble to kill, ravage, rampage, pillage, and destroy, that causes even the mildest of men to slaughter and kill and undertake bloodcurdling deeds. Durga depicts this part of the dark nature of the human being when she dances on corpses and drinks human blood. In these aspects she portrays the distilled, furious, savage power and lust of the frenzied warrior. Thus she shows how such a power, when left to itself, can prove to be a terrible threat to the world.

Durga is indeed the victorious force of the divine, and it is by her grace, passion, and speed that great achievements can be made. She is the warrior maiden who never shrinks from battle. In ancient India all kings invoked Durga for victory in battle. The Mahabharata states that when King Yudhistira set out to battle with the Kauravas, he remembered the promise made by the Divine Mother in the Devi Mahatmyam and praised her with the famous Durga Stotram (hymn to Durga) before proceeding for battle:

Twilight, night, light, sleep, moonlight, loveliness, patience, compassion.
When honored, you cause to perish the bondage of men,
Their delusion, death of sons, loss of wealth, sickness, death, and fear.
Fallen from my kingdom, I submissively take refuge in you,
Just as I have bowed my head to you, O Goddess! Queen of the gods!
Protect me, one of lotus-petal eyes! Truth! Be true to us,
Be a refuge for me, O Durga!
O refuge! O One who is fond of her devotees!


Durga answers,

Victory in battle will soon be yours,
Having by my grace conquered and slain the Kaurava army,
Having made your kingdom free from troubles,
You will again enjoy the earth,
Together with your brothers, O King,
You will obtain abundant favor,
And by my grace, happiness and health will be yours. —MAHABHARATA


Thus ends the tenth chapter of Shakti, known as “Durga,” describing the form and function of the warrior goddess. Aum Aim Hreem Kleem

Vanamali (2008-07-21). Shakti: Realm of the Divine Mother (Kindle Locations 1506-1641). Inner Traditions/Bear & Company. Kindle Edition.



The Great Adi Shakti Shri Mataji Nirmala Devi
Shri Mataji Nirmala Devi
“Different stages of human evolution took place when all these incarnations came on this earth.

Incarnations have to come. If you reason it out you will understand why an incarnation is needed to come on this earth. The unconscious can guide you through symbols which appear in your dreams. There are so many other ways by certain happenings the unconscious, the Divine can guide you, but it is all vague, extremely vague. The conscious must have a mouth to explain itself. It must have proper body to be able to communicate what it has to say otherwise how are you going to have a rapport with unconscious.

You cannot have any rapport with the divine unless and until you know you are Atman, your Atma. Before that whatever you may try may create a depth in you, a serenity in you, a character in you but still you cannot have a direct rapport.

You are to be connected. Now somebody has to do this job. That is why many incarnations came on this earth.”

The Messiah-Paraclete-Ruh-Devi



“The living process works in Sahaja Yoga. This is a fundamental point one should understand, that the living process holds by itself and gives its own beautiful growth to the nature, In the same way it starts working in the human being. Before a human being is enlightened he is like a dead seed which has no meaning. But, when it is sprouted it starts acting and the nature looks after it. Actually the nature is looked after by the same all-pervading power which is looking after the Sahaja Yogis who have now started their living process for the first time. As you will understand, human beings cannot do any living work. Whatever is dead, they convert it into another dead thing, and they get into ego. But a Sahaja Yogi can very easily understand that he is now holding his powers and that when he uses them they grow much deeper and wider and they give him more confidence in whatever he is doing.

This faith is not blind, it is the faith which has been experimented and has been found out on your finger tips. You can know the truth which is said in some of the scriptures. For the time being one has to concentrate on improving yourself, cleansing yourself and then you should project your attention onto others who voluntarily come to you or ask for realisation, But never go from door to door to ask them to come, or to beg of them to get realisation. There is no place for such people in the Kingdom of God, Only those who want and are anxiously trying to evolve, one should pay attention to because we must respect to freedom which has been given to human beings to choose whether they want to ascend or descend.”

The Messiah-Paraclete-Ruh-Devi



“The main problem we have is how to imbibe this within our personality that we are facing this kind of an Incarnation, that we are born in such an era which is very important. It is a very special Time.”

Shri Mataji Nirmala Devi


Shree Durga Shuktam

"Goddess Durga represents the power of the Supreme Being that preserves moral order and righteousness in the creation. The Sanskrit word Durga means a fort or a place that is protected and thus difficult to reach. Durga, also called Divine Mother, protects mankind from evil and misery by destroying evil forces such as selfishness, jealousy, prejudice, hatred, anger, and ego.

Goddess Durga is also called by many other names, such as Parvati, Ambika, and Kali. In the form of Parvati, She is known as the divine spouse of Lord Shiva and is The Mother of Her two sons, Ganesha and Karttikeya. There are many temples dedicated to Durga's worship in India.

In Her images, Goddess Durga is shown in a female form, wearing red clothes. She has eighteen arms, carrying many objects in Her hands. The red color symbolizes action and the red clothes signify that She is always busy destroying evil and protecting mankind from pain and suffering caused by the evil forces. Following is the symbolism associated with Goddess Durga:

A tiger symbolizes unlimited power. Durga riding a tiger indicates that She possesses unlimited power and uses it to protect virtue and destroy evil. The eighteen arms of Durga signify that She possesses combined power of the nine incarnations of Lord Vishnu that have appeared on earth at different times in the past. The tenth incarnation, the Kalki (a man on a white horse), is still to come. Thus, Goddess Durga represents a united front of all Divine forces against the negative forces of evil and wickedness.

The sound that emanates from a conch is the sound of the sacred syllable OHM, which is said to be the sound of creation. A conch in one of the Goddess's hands signifies the ultimate victory of virtue over evil and righteousness over unrighteousness.

Other weapons in the hands of Durga such as a mace, sword, disc, arrow, and trident convey the idea that one weapon cannot destroy all kinds of enemies. Different weapons must be used to fight enemies depending upon the circumstances. For example, selfishness must be destroyed by detachment, jealousy by desirelessness, prejudice by self-knowledge, and ego by discrimination.

The popular form of worship of Goddess Durga is that of lighting the Lamp of lime on Tuesdays and Fridays during Rahu kaalam. Cut a lime into two halves. Squeeze the juice and invert the lime halves by pushing the the skin side in. Pour ghee or oil. Insert a cotton wick. Light the lime lamp and recite the Durga Gayathri and Durga Shuktam. The kind-hearted mother will bless her devotees with happiness and prosperity.”

Shree Durga Shuktam
http://www.chennaionline.com/





"Durga is an incarnation of Devi or The Mother Goddess, a unified symbol of all divine forces. For Shaivas Durga is the wife of Shiva. For Vaishnavas and Shaktas Durga is another form of Uma or Parvati.

The Hindu Goddess Durga manifested when evil forces threatened the very existence of the Gods. To destroy these demons, all gods offered their radiance to her creation and each formed part of Durga's body. Durga also obtained very powerful weapons, such as the chakra from Vishnu and a trident from Shiva.

The name"Durga“In Sanskrit means“Invincible.” The syllable"du“Is synonymous with the 4 devils of poverty, sufferings, famine and evil habits. The"r"refers to diseases and the"ga“Is the destroyer of sins, injustice, irreligion, cruelty and laziness.

Durga killed the powerful demon Mahish and all his great commanders. Demonic forces are self-destructive but very powerful. Divine forces are constructive but slow and efficient. When demonic forces create imbalance, all gods unite, becoming one divine force called Shakti or Durga.”

http://www.sanatansociety.org/





DURGA PUJA OR NAVARATRI

"Durga represents the Divine Mother. She is the energy aspect of the Lord. Without Durga, Shiva has no expression and without Shiva, Durga has no existence. Shiva is the soul of Durga; Durga is identical with Shiva. Lord Shiva is only the silent witness. He is motionless, absolutely changeless. He is not affected by the cosmic play. It is Durga who does everything.

Shakti is the omnipotent power of the Lord, or the Cosmic Energy. The Divine Mother is represented as having ten different weapons in Her hands. She sits on a lion. She keeps up the play of the Lord through the three attributes of Nature, namely, Sattwa, Rajas and Tamas. Knowledge, peace, lust, anger, greed, egoism and pride, are all Her forms.

You will find in the Devi Sukta of the Rig Veda Samhita that Vak, symbolising speech, the daughter of the sage Anbhirna, realised her identity with the Divine Mother, the Power of the Supreme Lord, which manifests throughout the universe among the gods, among men and beasts and among the creatures of the deep ocean.

In the Kena Upanishad, you will find that the Divine Mother shed wisdom on Indra and the gods and said that the gods were able to defeat the demons only with the help of the power of the Supreme Lord.

The worship of Devi, the universal Mother, leads to the attainment of knowledge of the Self. The story in the Kena Upanishad known as the"Yaksha Prasna", supports this view. It tells how Uma, the Divine Mother, taught the Truth to the gods. Goddess Shakti thus sheds wisdom on Her devotees.

Devi worship is, therefore, worship of God's glory, of God's greatness and supremacy. It is adoration of the Almighty. It is unfortunate that Devi is ignorantly understood by many as a mere blood-thirsty Hindu Goddess. No! Devi is not a vicious demoness nor is She the property of the Hindus alone. Devi does not belong to any religion. Devi is that conscious power of God. The words Devi, Shakti, etc., and the ideas of different forms connected with these names are concessions granted by the sages due to the limitations of the human intellect; they are by no means the ultimate definitions of Shakti.

The original or Adi Shakti is beyond human comprehension. Bhagavan Krishna says in the Gita: “This is only My lower nature. Beyond this is My higher nature, the life-principle which sustains the universe.”

The Upanishad also says: “The supreme power of God is manifested in various ways. This power is of the nature of God, manifesting as knowledge, strength and activity.”

Truly speaking, all beings in the universe are Shakti-worshippers, whether they are aware of it or not, for there is no one who does not love and long for power in some form or other. Physicists and scientists have now proved that everything is pure, imperishable energy. This energy is only a form of divine Shakti which exists in every form.

A child is more familiar with The Mother than with the father, because The Mother is very kind, loving, tender and affectionate and looks after the needs of the child. In the spiritual field also, the aspirant or the devotee—the spiritual child—has an intimate relationship with The Mother Durga, more than with the Father Shiva. Therefore, it behoves the aspirant to approach The Mother first, who then introduces Her spiritual child to the Father for his illumination.

The Mother's Grace is boundless. Her mercy is illimitable; Her knowledge infinite; Her power immeasurable; Her glory ineffable; and Her splendour indescribable. She gives you material prosperity as well as spiritual freedom.

Approach Her with an open heart. Lay bare your heart to Her with frankness and humility. Be as simple as a child. Kill ruthlessly the enemies of egoism, cunningness, selfishness and crookedness. Make a total, unreserved, and ungrudging self-surrender to Her. Sing Her praise. Repeat Her Name. Worship Her with faith and unflinching devotion. Perform special worship on the Navaratri days. Navaratri is the most suitable occasion for doing intense spiritual practices. These nine days are very sacred to the Divine Mother. Plunge yourself in Her worship. Practise intense repetition of the Divine Name, having a regular"quota"of repetitions per day, and the number of hours spent on it.

Devi fought with Bhandasura and his forces for nine days and nine nights. This Bhandasura had a wonderful birth and life. When Lord Shiva burnt Cupid with the fire of His"third eye", Sri Ganesha playfully moulded a figure out of the ashes, and the Lord breathed life into it! This was the terrible demon Bhandasura. He engaged himself in great penance and on account of it obtained a boon from Lord Shiva. With the help of that boon, he began harassing the worlds. The Divine Mother fought with him for nine nights (the demons have extraordinary strength during the night), and killed him on the evening of the tenth day, known as the Vijaya Dasami. The learning of any science is begun on this highly auspicious day. It was on this day that Arjuna worshipped Devi, before starting the battle against the Kauravas on the field of Kurukshetra.

Sri Rama worshipped Durga at the time of the fight with Ravana, to invoke Her aid in the war. This was on the days preceding the Vijaya Dasami day. He fought and won through Her Grace.”

Swami Sivananda, DURGA PUJA OR NAVARATRI





"Goddess Durga represents the power of the Supreme Being that preserves moral order and righteousness in the creation. The Sanskrit word Durga means a fort or a place that is protected and thus difficult to reach. Durga, also called Divine Mother, protects mankind from evil and misery by destroying evil forces such as selfishness, jealousy, prejudice, hatred, anger, and ego.

The worship of Goddess Durga is very popular among Hindus. She is also called by many other names, such as Parvati, Ambika, and Kali In the form of Parvati, She is known as the divine spouse of Lord Shiva and is The Mother of Her two sons, Ganesha and Karttikeya, and daughter Jyoti. There are many temples dedicated to Durga's worship in India.

In Her images, Goddess Durga is shown in a female form, wearing red clothes. She has eighteen arms, carrying many objects in Her hands. The red color symbolizes action and the red clothes signify that She is always busy destroying evil and protecting mankind from pain and suffering caused by evil forces. Following is the symbolism associated with Goddess Durga:

A tiger symbolizes unlimited power. Durga riding a tiger indicates that She possesses unlimited power and uses it to protect virtue and destroy evil. The eighteen arms of Durga signify that She possesses combined power of the nine incarnations of Lord Vishnu that have appeared on the earth at different times in the past. The tenth incarnation, the Kalkin (a man on a white horse), is still to come. Thus, Goddess Durga represents a united front of all Divine forces against the negative forces of evil and wickedness.

The sound that emanates from a conch is the sound of the sacred syllable AUM, which is said to be the sound of creation. A conch in one of the Goddess's hands signifies the ultimate victory of virtue over evil and righteousness over unrighteousness.

Other weapons in the hands of Durga such as a mace, sword, disc, arrow, and trident convey the idea that one weapon cannot destroy all different kinds of enemies. Different weapons must be used to fight enemies depending upon the circumstances. For example, selfishness must be destroyed by detachment, jealousy by desirelessness, prejudice by self-knowledge, and ego by discrimination.”

Bansi Pandit





"Two kinds of knowledge (vidya) are to be known: that of the Brahma-of-sounds (sabda- brahman) and that of the Highest Brahman (param-brahman.) The brahman-of-sounds is the aggregate of all the hymns, formulae, charms, incantation, prayers, and exegetical commentaries that constitute the Vedic revelation. This Brahman cannot be the Highest, however, because it is endowed with name and form; names to assist the mind, and the sound-forms of speech, song, melody, and prose (naman and rupa.) But anyone laved (nisnata) in Sabda-Brahman goes on to the Highest Brahman. Having studied the books (grantha) assiduously (abhyasa: this is the term for constant endeavor in yogic practice), the wise, intent on knowledge solely, and on the plenitude-of-knowledge (vijnana), should discard books completely — just as a person trying to get at rice throws the husks away.”1

The inferior, preliminary wisdom is like a raft — to be forsaken once it has transported its voyager to its destination. Sacrificial lore and the ethical rituals of life have to be left behind at the brink of the higher realization.2

“This is to be attained only by truthfulness (Satya) and asceticism (tapas), real insight (samyag-jnana) and unbroken continence (brahmacarya.) Consisting of divine light, resplendent, It resides within the body. Ascetics behold It, who have annihilated their defects.”3

“This Self is not attained through teaching, intelligence, or much learning. It is attained by him only whom It chooses. To such a one this Self discloses Its proper nature (tanum svam.)"4

"Verily, the Self that is in the three states of waking (jagrut), dream (svapna), and dreamless sleep (susupti), is to be understood as one and the same. For him who has transcended this triad of states, there is no rebirth.

"Being verily one, the Self-of-all-beings-and-elements is present in every being. It is beheld onefold and manifold simultaneously, like the moon reflected in water.”5

Heinrich Zimmer, Philosophies of India



Notes
1. Amrtabindu Upanishad 17-18 Vijnana (“The plenitude of knowledge"): the vi — here refers to Infinity, which is all comprehensive and leaves no margin wherein any unincluded, second entity might exist. Vijnana is therefore nondual (advaita) knowledge (jnana), and as such synonymous with the state known to Vedanta as Turiya, the"Fourth.”This is beyond the three planes of waking consciousness, dream consciousness, and deep sleep. Such would seem to be the meaning of the term vijnana in the Bhagavad Gita also. 2. Throughout the later periods of Hindu tradition the term"lower wisdom" (aparavidya) has been regarded as referring to wisdom committed to writing: book lore is to be finally discarded. The injunction resembles that of the European alchemists,” rumpite libros ne corda vestra rumpantur,” but lacks the touch of polemic criticism. 3. Mundaka Upanishad 3. 1. 5. (cf. Hume, op. Cit., p. 374.) 4. Ib. 3. 2. 3. (cf. Hume, op. cit., p. 376.) Compare the Christian doctrine of Grace. 5. Amrtabindu Upanishad 11-12. There is but one moon in the nightly firmament, yet it is reflected in numerous jars standing in the moonlight. The jars, perishable clay, are compared to individuals.” Sri Lalita Sahasranama 701-800

701) Sri Desa-kala-paricchinna
— The Truth unbroken by Time and Space.
— The All Pervading Eternal Truth.

Sri Lalita Sahasranama
C. S. Murthy, Associate Advertisers and Printers, 1989





702) Sri Sarvaga
— Present Everywhere and in Everything.

Sri Lalita Sahasranama
C. S. Murthy, Associate Advertisers and Printers, 1989





705) Sri Sastramayi
— The Mother of all Scriptures.

Sri Lalita Sahasranama
C. S. Murthy, Associate Advertisers and Printers, 1989





706)Sri Guhama
— The Mother that dwells in the Heart.

Sri Lalita Sahasranama
C. S. Murthy, Associate Advertisers and Printers, 1989





707) Sri Guhya-rupini
— Beyond the Senses. — Unseen and Secret.

Sri Lalita Sahasranama
C. S. Murthy, Associate Advertisers and Printers, 1989





713) Sri Guru-mandala-rupini
— The Unbroken Line of Divine Messengers.
— The Succession of Gurus that is She Herself.

Sri Lalita Sahasranama
C. S. Murthy, Associate Advertisers and Printers, 1989





718) Sri Mahi
— The Mother Earth.
— Giver of all Life and Food.

Sri Lalita Sahasranama
C. S. Murthy, Associate Advertisers and Printers, 1989





719) Sri Ganamba
— The Mother of Sri Ganesha.

Sri Lalita Sahasranama
C. S. Murthy, Associate Advertisers and Printers, 1989





725) Sri Daksinamurti-Rupini
— The Form of Sri Daksinamurti, The Cosmic Guru.
— The Treasure-House of All Knowledge.

Sri Lalita Sahasranama
C. S. Murthy, Associate Advertisers and Printers, 1989





736) Sri Muktida
— The One who confers Liberation.

Sri Lalita Sahasranama
C. S. Murthy, Associate Advertisers and Printers, 1989





737) Sri Mukti-Rupini
— The Form of Liberation.
— The Supreme Knowledge of Liberation.

Sri Lalita Sahasranama
C. S. Murthy, Associate Advertisers and Printers, 1989





739) Sri Layakari
— The Fifth State beyond Turiya.
— The State where individual and Cosmic Consciousness merge.

Sri Lalita Sahasranama
C. S. Murthy, Associate Advertisers and Printers, 1989





741) Sri Rambhadi-Vandita
— Worshipped by the most beautiful Celestial Courtesans.

Sri Lalita Sahasranama
C. S. Murthy, Associate Advertisers and Printers, 1989





742) Sri Bhava-Dava-Sudha-Vrstih
— Ambrosial rain which extinguishes the forest fire of Samsara.
— Ends the cycle of births and death.

Sri Lalita Sahasranama
C. S. Murthy, Associate Advertisers and Printers, 1989





743) Sri Paparanya-Davanala
— Forest fire that burns all sins.
— Destroys sins of devotees.

Sri Lalita Sahasranama
C. S. Murthy, Associate Advertisers and Printers, 1989





750) Sri Mahesvari
— The Great Ruler.

Sri Lalita Sahasranama
C. S. Murthy, Associate Advertisers and Printers, 1989





751) Sri Mahakali
— Wife of Sri Shiva.
— The Destroyer of Death.

Sri Lalita Sahasranama
C. S. Murthy, Associate Advertisers and Printers, 1989





755) Sri Candika
— Angry with evil forces.

Sri Lalita Sahasranama
C. S. Murthy, Associate Advertisers and Printers, 1989





757) Sri Ksara-Ksaratmika
— Eternal and Indestructible.

Sri Lalita Sahasranama
C. S. Murthy, Associate Advertisers and Printers, 1989





758) Sri Sarva-Lokesi
— Queen of all 14 Worlds.

Sri Lalita Sahasranama
C. S. Murthy, Associate Advertisers and Printers, 1989





759) Sri Visva-Dharini
— The One who contains all Universes.

Sri Lalita Sahasranama
C. S. Murthy, Associate Advertisers and Printers, 1989





765) Sri Suddha
— Pure Knowledge.

Sri Lalita Sahasranama
C. S. Murthy, Associate Advertisers and Printers, 1989





768) Sri Dyuti-Dhara
— The Light.

Sri Lalita Sahasranama
C. S. Murthy, Associate Advertisers and Printers, 1989





772) Sri Duraradhya
— Difficult to be worshipped by the incompetent.
— Difficult to be worshipped by those unable to control the senses.

Sri Lalita Sahasranama
C. S. Murthy, Associate Advertisers and Printers, 1989





777) Sri Viraradhya
— Worshipped by the valiant.
Sri Lalita Sahasranama
C. S. Murthy, Associate Advertisers and Printers, 1989





780) Sri Visvatomukhi
— Creatrix of the Universe.
—“Having eyes and faces everywhere.”Svetasvataropanisad 3.3

Sri Lalita Sahasranama
C. S. Murthy, Associate Advertisers and Printers, 1989





783) Sri Pranada
— The Giver of Life.

Sri Lalita Sahasranama
C. S. Murthy, Associate Advertisers and Printers, 1989





788) Sri Jayatsena
— Having victorious armies of Divine Forces.

Sri Lalita Sahasranama
C. S. Murthy, Associate Advertisers and Printers, 1989





800) Sri Rasa-Sevadhih
— The Ocean of Bliss.

Sri Lalita Sahasranama
C. S. Murthy, Associate Advertisers and Printers, 1989



A Mystic's Message Of Peace to Mankind

In this rare epigrammatic discourse Thiruchi Swami speaks of the perennial human plight and the path to liberation.

1 India has all along its history held that peace is the most valuable treasure for mankind. All the schools of thought, all the saints and seers, all the visionaries and poets have advocated the cause of peace. Indeed, all the religions of the world and all prophets have sung the praises of peace; and whatever may be the doctrinal or other differences between religions and sects, there is perfect unanimity in their appeal for peace as the most prized possession of man.

2 Naturally, one may wonder why, in spite of such unanimous advocacy of peace, mankind has been witnessing wars and conflicts without a break all through history. There is not a single country in the world which has not suffered by the breach of peace to a smaller or to a greater extent. Great saints and prophets have come and gone. They have all preached peace eloquently and honestly, but their influence has not been considerable in preventing dissensions and conflicts.

3 One of the schools of Indian thought, the Mimamsakas, have held that the world remains essentially the same all through the years. The doctrine that na hi kada-chid anidrasam jagat,” the world was never any different from what it is now,” implies that the affairs of the world do not alter with the passage of time and that human nature remains identical whatever the affairs of the world. History, in a sense, truly repeats itself. Wars have always been fought, and violence, deceit, ambition, envy, hatred, fear, suspicion, anger, pride, revenge, passion and prejudice have dogged man all through his career on the globe. The course of mankind has not changed despite prophets and messiahs, sages and seers.

4 But this is no justification for pessimism or cynicism. It is the nature of all phenomena that when things go wrong, corrections are promptly applied and the original state is sought to be restored. Wars are fought and peace is sought thereafter. Periods of agitation and turmoil are always followed by spells of calm and comfort. Depravity soon gives place to good sense. But it is a significant detail to note that such corrections do not occur spontaneously or mechanically. There are always individuals who are divinely inspired and operate as if they are emissaries of Destiny. Whenever evil prevails and the good suffers, God will manifest Himself to put down the evil and support the cause of the good.

5 The Vedic seer visualized a state of composure and contentment in which not only all the living beings but also the natural forces settle down amicably for mutual benefit and betterment. He did not distinguish between human beings and animals and plants or yet between animate beings and inanimate things. They were all alike eligible for peace and happiness. The Veda treats all aspects of existence equally as sources of a comfort or distress for man depending on how he approaches them.

6 Shanti, meaning"peace and well being,” is a powerful Indian word, frequently found on the lips of Indian populace since very ancient times till our own day. Shanti is a state where one is free from both happiness, sukha, and sorrow, dukha. It is a state of perfect bliss.

7 As is well known, shanti as an invocation for peace is uttered in India thrice: Om Shanthih, Shanthih, Shanthihi. The initial Om represents the Vedic lore in its essence and stands for Godhead, pure and absolute. The three shantis are peace in the individual, adhyatmika, peace in the surroundings, adhi-bhautika, and peace in the spiritual context, adhi-daivika. The individual peace relates to body and mind; peace in the surrounding comprehends the physical environment and the social situations; and the third peace refers to the forces beyond our normal control. The three shantis answer to the three-fold ills that man is heir to: tapatraya — physical and mental ailments (adhyatmika), troubles from wild and cruel animals and from unfriendly fellow humans (adhi bhautika), and distresses caused by unforeseen calamities and natural upheavals (adhi-daivika). There is, thus, need for man to safeguard his existence from disease, social stresses and ecological disasters. Remaining in a state of peace, shanthi, is the only solution to all these predicaments.

8 Indian thought further analysis the human predicament as mainly due to errors of judgment (prajnaparadha). Diseases are caused by not knowing or not attending to what and how and when we should eat, how we should exercise and order our lives, etc. Social stresses are occasioned by our ignorance of how to interact with others around us and by our own inability to keep our emotions under check. Ecological disasters are caused by our ambition, greed and insensibility. We undermine our health, vitiate the relations with others around us, and exploit natural resources in order to maximize our happiness, and the entire process becomes counterproductive.

9 There is a popular saying that man wants to be happy but does not bother about the method for securing it; and he wants to avoid sorrow but does not give up the things that necessarily produce sorrow. This is man's predicament. He knows what is right but lacks the will to pursue it. He is aware of what is bad but is unable to forsake it. He wants what he does not get and gets what he does not want. The result is that he is not happy either with what he wants or with what he gets. His unhappiness makes him sour, angry and violent in his speech, thought and actions. A large number of such people will make conflict, discord and hatred unavoidable.

10 Passions that are not controlled are like fire that not only burns where it arises but spreads all round and causes misery to others. Indian culture attaches importance to the individual more than to the society. Its message is that man must be in his own life restrained and noble, and that it is only then that the society can flourish. For, after all, society is a collection of individuals. How can society be all right when the individuals composing it are not all right? Social stresses are caused by individuals who are under stress in their own lives. A man who is really happy cannot think of making others unhappy; he can only make them happy.

11 Therefore, our saints have warned that six enemies are lurking within each individual (arishadvarga), and we are to be constantly vigilant, lest they overpower us. They are ambitions and desires (kama), hatred and anger (krodha), greed and hankering (lobha), ignorance and indolence (moha), arrogance and conceit (mada), and envy and jealousy (matsarya). Research by yogis has revealed that lack of awareness of reality (avidya) and repulsion towards objects (dwesha) and desire for life (abhinivesha) are the causes of all miseries in life. These afflictions (kleshas) have to be reduced to the vanishing point. The first and foremost task of every religion should, therefore, be the building up of the inner man, chastening of his emotions and refining of these attitudes and aspirations.

12 A real hero is a master of himself. He does not lord over others; nor does he allow anything or anyone to rule over himself. What does it profit to conquer the whole world and lose oneself in the bargain? Plenty and power are not the solution for man's predicament on earth. Restraint and rest are the answer.

13 Peace, in other words, rests finally in each one of us. It is a matter for each individual to strive for and become. It cannot be a community program. Purity of purpose, sincerity of heart and strength of will are personal factors, and they alone contribute to the success of any undertaking. Our saints insist on purification of one's own mind and heart (antaranga-shuddhi) before one sets out to correct the ills of the society or the world.

14 Indeed, one can never make the world a perfect place for all of us to live in. The miseries of poverty, aggression, exploitation, corruption and violence can never be totally eradicated from the world. But a wise person can make himself immune to all the stresses by developing spiritual resistance. Is it possible to spread carpets over all the roads so that you can walk safely and with comfort? But you can still achieve that end when you cover your feet with sandals. When the soles of your feet are covered, the entire stretch of earth is as good as being covered with carpet. More important and more practical than correcting the world is therefore correcting oneself. As the preamble to UNESCO rightly puts it,” Since wars begin in the minds of men, it is in the minds of men that the defenses of peace must be constructed.”

15 This is possible only when we learn to turn our attention inward. We read in the Kathopanishad that ordinarily man is engaged with the world outside because his sense organs and mind are by construction outwardly oriented. But a wise man will shut his sense organs and open the inward eye. When we are involved with the outside, stress results; but when the gaze is inward, peace will alight on us, because the very nature of Self is peace (Santoyam atma as another Upanishad says). Peace is, thus, a quality of life and each one has to discover it within himself.

16 Although most miseries are psychophysical, the mind being the more suitable and primary, is the ultimate host of all miseries, verily. The mind can make a heaven of hell and a hell of heaven. How to transform hell into heaven and help retain heaven is the quest that the seeker of peace is after.

17 It is our considered opinion that enduring and effective peace can result only from more and more people taking to the path of religious devotions (upasana). Religious devotion does not consist of dogmas, creeds, sectarian affiliations or regional differences. It is a way of life in which the thoughts and feelings are continually chastened while they are directed towards the supreme reality which is within. Temples, worship, rituals, religious observances and a life of restraint are all directed towards this end. The body of a truly religious person is itself the temple, and his spirit verily is the Godhead. The fundamental need of the world — far deeper than any social, political or economic readjustment — is, therefore, a spiritual awakening, a recovery of faith.

18 Everyone should, therefore, know what life is, why life is and how life is. Without knowing these things, life can never be lived properly. Right life comprises the three disciplines: physical, moral and spiritual. The error of man is to prefer the veiled to the revealed and the twilight of illusion to the light of reality. Life should, therefore, be lived with some definite aim or goal. It should be planned and discriminative, with duties absolutely necessary and helpful for achieving the aim in the shortest possible time.

19 May the Devi, our chosen form of the Godhead, our Universal Mother Gnanakshi Sri Rajarajeswari, who presides over the destiny of all the worlds, instill in our hearts good sense, right discrimination and firm resolve so that our individual lives may become abodes of peace. May the little lamps thus lit, millions of them, illumine the world and make it a place fit for enduring and meaningful peace.

Jagadguru Sri Sri Sri Shivarathnapuri Bhagawath Padachariya Thiruchimahaswamiji





Two kinds of knowledge (vidya) are to be known: that of the Brahma-of-sounds (sabda- brahman) and that of the Highest Brahman (param-brahman.) The brahman-of-sounds is the aggregate of all the hymns, formulae, charms, incantation, prayers, and exegetical commentaries that constitute the Vedic revelation. This Brahman cannot be the Highest, however, because it is endowed with name and form; names to assist the mind, and the sound-forms of speech, song, melody, and prose (naman and rupa.) But anyone laved (nisnata) in Sabda-Brahman goes on to the Highest Brahman. Having studied the books (grantha) assiduously (abhyasa: this is the term for constant endeavor in yogic practice), the wise, intent on knowledge solely, and on the plenitude-of-knowledge (vijnana), should discard books completely — just as a person trying to get at rice throws the husks away.”1

The inferior, preliminary wisdom is like a raft — to be forsaken once it has transported its voyager to its destination. Sacrificial lore and the ethical rituals of life have to be left behind at the brink of the higher realization.2

“This is to be attained only by truthfulness (Satya) and asceticism (tapas), real insight (samyag-jnana) and unbroken continence (brahmacarya.) Consisting of divine light, resplendent, It resides within the body. Ascetics behold It, who have annihilated their defects.”3

“This Self is not attained through teaching, intelligence, or much learning. It is attained by him only whom It chooses. To such a one this Self discloses Its proper nature (tanum svam.)"4

"Verily, the Self that is in the three states of waking (jagrut), dream (svapna), and dreamless sleep (susupti), is to be understood as one and the same. For him who has transcended this triad of states, there is no rebirth.

"Being verily one, the Self-of-all-beings-and-elements is present in every being. It is beheld onefold and manifold simultaneously, like the moon reflected in water.”5

1. Amrtabindu Upanishad 17-18 Vijnana (“The plenitude of knowledge"): the vi — here refers to Infinity, which is all comprehensive and leaves no margin wherein any unincluded, second entity might exist. Vijnana is therefore nondual (advaita) knowledge (jnana), and as such synonymous with the state known to Vedanta as Turiya, the"Fourth.”This is beyond the three planes of waking consciousness, dream consciousness, and deep sleep. Such would seem to be the meaning of the term vijnana in the Bhagavad Gita also.
2. Throughout the later periods of Hindu tradition the term"lower wisdom" (aparavidya) has been regarded as referring to wisdom committed to writing: book lore is to be finally discarded. The injunction resembles that of the European alchemists,” rumpite libros ne corda vestra rumpantur,” but lacks the touch of polemic criticism.
3. Mundaka Upanishad 3. 1. 5. (cf. Hume, op. Cit., p. 374.)
4. Ib. 3. 2. 3. (cf. Hume, op. cit., p. 376.) Compare the Christian doctrine of Grace.
5. Amrtabindu Upanishad 11-12. There is but one moon in the nightly firmament, yet it is reflected in numerous jars standing in the moonlight. The jars, perishable clay, are compared to individuals.”

Heinrich Zimmer, Philosophies of India





There is no one greater in the three worlds than the guru.
It is he who grants divine knowledge and should be worshiped with supreme devotion.Atharva Veda
Abiding in the midst of ignorance, but thinking themselves wise and learned, fools aimlessly go hither and thither,
Like blind led by the blind.

Atharva Veda



Truth is the Supreme, the Supreme is Truth.
Through Truth men never fall from the heavenly world, because Truth belongs to the saints.
Therefore, they rejoice in Truth.

Yajur Veda



The supreme mystery in the Veda's end, which has been declared in former times, should not be given to one not tranquil,
Nor again to one who is not a son or a pupil.
To one who has the highest devotion for God, and for his spiritual teacher even as for God,
To him these matters which have been declared become manifest if he be a great soul —
Yea, become manifest if he be a great soul!

Yajur Veda



Disciples get, by devotion to the guru, the knowledge which the guru possesses.
In the three worlds this fact is clearly enunciated by divine sages, the ancestors and learned men.
Guru Gita



It is laid down by the Lord that there can be no moksha (liberation) without diksha (initiation);
And initiation cannot be there without a teacher.

Kularnava Tantra



Though himself unattached, the guru, after testing him for some time, on command of the Lord,
Shall deliver the Truth to his disciple in order to vest him with authority.
Of him who is so invested with authority, there is verily union with the Supreme Siva.
At the termination of the bodily life, his is the eternal liberation — this is declared by the Lord.
Therefore, one should seek with all effort to have a guru of the unbroken tradition, born of Supreme Siva himself.

Kularnava Tantra



Without a teacher, all philosophy, traditional knowledge and mantras are fruitless.
Him alone the Gods laud who is the guru, keeping active what is handed down by tradition.

Kularnava Tantra



I adore the lotus feet of the teachers who have shown to us the source of the eternal ocean of bliss, born of the Self within, Who have given us the remedy for the hala-hala poison of samsara.

Guru Gita





“The yogin can choose between two distinct approaches in order to attain emancipation ... Either he sets out to discover his essence, the Self, whilst relying on his own innate strength, or else he calls for help from the Divine Being. In both cases, however, he must open himself to an order of life higher than his empirical personality. In the latter approach he makes use of the powerful human capacity for love. The inner vacuum which is created by turning away from worldly pursuits, is now filled with a truly prodigious power which assists him in overcoming even the strongest resistance of the mind to being transmuted into pure consciousness and thereby transcending the boundaries of the spatio-temporal universe. The divine grace (prasada) of Purusottama safely guards the devotee across the chasms of mundane life into the supreme abode of the Lord ...

It is self-evident that the love pulsating in the divine body of God is not of an emotional or intellectual nature. The love that flourishes eternally between God and the Self-particles who have awakened to His presence is one of ineffable divine creativity: The whole communing with Itself ... Emancipation depends on God. No amount of self-effort can bring about the final fruit of self-transcendence. We must release all tension within us and relinquish our self-will and become still. God's great work can only be accomplished when the soul has become tranquil (prasada.) Then we are able to open ourselves to the divine omnipresence. This is true bhakti, which gives birth to the grace (prasada) of God.”

Georg Feuerstein, Introduction to the Bhagavad Gita
Rider & Co. 1974, p. 161-2.





In this great wheel of Brahman, the life and foundation of all, the soul wanders like a swan, thinking himself and the Inspirer to be separate. When grace comes from Him, he attains immortality. 7. This has been praised as the supreme Brahman in which the threefold reality is established and imperishable. Those who know Brahman within, realizing Brahman and absorbed in Brahman, are released from birth. 8. The Lord encompasses this all, composed of things perishable and imperishable, formed and unformed. The self, a mere enjoyer, suffers without a Lord, but he who knows God is freed from all fetters. 9. Two are unborn, the knower and the ignorant; the Lord and the not-Lord. The one, an enjoyer, is chained to enjoyments; the other, the atman, is infinite, of universal form, nonactive. By knowing the threefold, one also knows Brahman. 10. Perishable is matter; immortal, imperishable the Lord, who, the One, controls the perishable and also the soul. Meditating on him, uniting with him, becoming more and more like him, one is freed at the last from the world's illusion. 12. The Eternal which resides in the atman should be known. Beyond this there is nothing that needs to be known. The enjoyer, the object of enjoyment, the Inspirer — this has been declared to be the All, the threefold Brahman.

SU I, 6-10; 12





O wise one, this is the established doctrine concerning Devi; She is the Vedas, the sacrifices, the heaven and all this universe;
The universe, immovable as well as movable, is pervaded by the Devi.
She is all that is sacrificed to and worshipped by the Devas; And She is all that is food and drink;
Manifold in form and name, Devi is everywhere — In trees, in the Earth, in the air, in the ether, in water, and in fire.

Devi Purana





O, Mother of the Universe, those who praise you by the words: ambika, jaganmayi and maya, will obtain all.

Kalika Purana





If one aspirant thinks in his mind one single name of Hers, in that moment he knows the chakra of The Mother, O beloved one.

Vamakesvara-tantra





Those who prostrating their bodies praise You by the words:
Maya, durga, vedagarbha, amba, bhadra, bhadrakali, ksemya, ksemamkari, in the mornings and evenings,
Will obtain all the desired objects by My Grace.

Visnu Purana





It is impossible, O Sage, for me to enumerate,
The countless names of Devi in hundred crores of Kalpas.

Skanda Purana





What can I say? Devi has countless names, which have been composed by Brahma and other Devatas
According to Her different qualities and doings.

Devi-bhagavata Purana



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Home
Introduction
New Age Children
CHILDREN OF THE NEW AGE
—  “THEY ARE DIFFERENT PAPA.”
—  “DID YOU SEE THE SUN, A LIGHT?”
—  MEETING THE UNIVERSAL SAVIOR
—  SUPREME SPIRIT OF THE SAHASRARA
—  THE DIVINE UNITY
—  THE TABLA PLAYER
“I ALSO RODE ON THE TIGER"
—  DEVI: THE GREAT GODDESS
—  “PAPA, YESTERDAY I SAW SHRI MATAJI"
—  THE CASE OF THE DOUBLE VISION
—  THE CASE OF THE DOUBLE TALK
—  THE CASE OF THE DOUBLE WITNESSES
—  THE CASE OF THE DOUBLE TIME
—  THE CASE OF THE DOUBLE MOTHERS
—  THE CASE OF THE DOUBLE BODIES
—  THE CASE OF THE DOUBLE WORLDS

Miracle Photo
Meeting His Messengers
Prophecies
Age Of Aquarius
Nostradamus
Mayan End Age 12-21-2012
Our Conscious Earth
Adi Shakti's Descent
Witnessing Holy Spirit's Miracles
Jesus' Resurrection
Book Of Revelation
His Human Adversary
Kitab Al Munir
Al-Qiyamah (The Resurrection)
His Light Within
His Universe Within
His Beings Within
Subtle System
Lectures To Earth
Shri Mataji
Self-Realization
Drumbeat Of Death
Lalita Kaur McGill University
Table Of Contents
Contact Us
Declaration of the Paraclete
The Paraclete opens the Kingdom of God
Cool Breeze of the Resurrection - BBC 1985
The Supreme Source Of Love 1985
The Great Mother
The Vision Part One
The Vision Part Two
The Vision Part Three
The Vision Part Four

Editor's Choice
She saw all gods & goddesses paying obeisance
Reincarnation quotes from famous people
Reincarnation in early Christianity
Reincarnation in the New Testament
Reincarnation in the Old Testament
Reincarnation in the Jewish Kabbalah
Value of direct experience
Face to Face with God
Octad to Goddess Tripurasundarii
Devi
Devi Gita
Hymn to Durga
Glory to the Divine Mother
Enduring presence of Divine Feminine
Arwinder, what it is to be a spirit?
Arwinder: “I think He (Buddha) is bald, a bit big.”